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Music Review: New

Hunter Burkard, Staff Writer

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“Bobby Tarantino II”
by Logic

Genre(s):
hip-hop

Logic’s 6th mixtape manages to muster a few decent tracks but ultimately falls short.
The first song on Bobby Tarantino II features cartoon figures Rick and Morty deciding which music they should play in their spaceship. Amongst other things, the duo discusses Logic’s two stylistic directions: “mixtape” Logic and “album” Logic. Rick makes the differentiation that Logic’s albums are more lyrical whereas his mixtapes are more boisterous. The Bobby Tarantino mixtape series, as Rick puts it, is somewhere “in the middle,” meshing the strong and purposeful lyricism of Logic’s albums with the swagger and confidence of Logic’s mixtapes.
Looking back on the first installment of the series, I would have to agree with Rick. Released in 2016 as a follow-up to his sophomore album, Bobby Tarantino (One) demonstrated Logic’s diverse skill-set as both a lyrical and rapid-fire rapper. The tracklist ranged from bangers like “Wrist” featuring Pusha T, which tells the fictional story of a Columbian drug lord reflecting on his sins, to songs like “44 Bars,” which details his struggles, hardships, and determination to keep persevering for his fans. Nonetheless, I had high hopes for the next installment of the Bobby Tarantino series.
Sadly, I feel as though the follow up is a dull replication of the first installment. Throughout this project, Logic piggybacks on the styles of his contemporaries and fails to construct a cohesive, succinct hook. “BoomTrap Protocol” sounds like a Kendrick Lamar throwaway and “Wassup,” featuring Big Sean, sounds like a b-side from the Good Music compilation album “Cruel Summer.” Every grouping of words that would resemble a “hook” is simply a protracted chorus that feels out of place amongst the punchiness of a Logic project. “44 More,” presumably a sequel track to “44 Bars,” is an obnoxious victory lap—not that a victory lap in hip-hop is necessarily bad but that the instrumental is unpleasant and his rapping is painfully cyclical.
Albeit a poor sequel to a great project, Bobby Tarantino II has some redeeming qualities. Although I find most of the tracks lukewarm, the project carries a degree of cohesiveness thanks to the executive production of in-house producer and longtime collaborator 6ix. I really enjoyed the bassline and synth progression on “State of Emergency,” featuring 2 Chainz, and “Everyday,” the collaboration with Marshmallow, was surprisingly catchy.

The album is subjectively okay but it pains me because I know that he can do better. I’ve genuinely enjoyed every project in his discography up until this date. I only hope that for his next project, which is self-proclaimed to be his last, he’ll be able to defend his position as one of the most versatile and creative rappers in the industry.

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