Weston Warhorse

Music Review: Retrospective

Hunter Burkard, Section Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“Process”
by Sampha

Genre(s):
electronic, r&b, neo-sou

The award-winning debut solo project of British singer, songwriter and producer Sampha excels on all metrics.
The first time I heard Sampha was back in 2013 when Drake sampled his vocals for the hook of “Too Much,” one of the standout singles on Drake’s third studio album Nothing Was the Same. Although I was impressed with Sampha’s vocal range on the hook, he soon fell off my radar as he was yet to release a full length debut project.
Nonetheless, when The Fader published a cover story on the UK artist, I was reminded of his creative potential and began to follow his releases almost religiously. I relished the three promotional tracks: “Timmy’s Prayer,” “Blood on Me” and “(No One Knows Me) Like the Piano.” Although all three tacks were equally commendable and sonically diverse, “Timmy’s Prayer,” featuring a writing credit from Kanye West, stood out to me because of Sampha’s ability to manifest raw emotion through biblical allusions and strong metaphor.
The juxtaposing string progression and baseline of “Plastic 100°C,” the opening track, magnifies Sampha’s raw lyricism and foreshadows the eerily smooth layering of emotion and composure found throughout Process. Although Sampha tends to touch on darker themes such as death, coping, and guilt on Process, the sombre direction results in a sort of amity, as though he’s grown from the tragedy he’s experienced. For instance, “(No One Knows Me) Like the Piano” is a wistful ballad about the comforts childhood yet the takeaway is less of melancholy sentimentality and more of affirmative nostalgia.
While Sampha’s ability to cultivate rich emotion is admirable, what truly makes the album unique and exemplary is how he blends elements of r&b, neo-soul, and electronic music. The way he efficiently organizes the percussion and other instrumentation—ranging from synths to Kora harps—tends to draw you in like a Drake, or perhaps a Marvin Gaye album, yet retains the polished, electronic aesthetic of a Frank Ocean release.

The overarching conclusion that I draw from Process is that it’s exceptionally inviting. The stimulating orchestration of the album coupled with Sampha’s deeply introspective lyrics makes Process such a profound yet easy listen.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    Music Review: New

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    A Critique of Music Critique

  • A & E

    60th Grammy Awards: Nominations and Predictions

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    From The Lorax to the Horatio Hornblower Series

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    Concussions

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    Album Review: Purpose by Justin Bieber

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    In space no one can hear you…farm: Ridley Scott’s The Martian is an astronomic success

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    Top Ten Netflix Binge Shows

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    “No Escape” Review: Escape While You Can

  • Music Review: Retrospective

    A & E

    Summer Movie Wrap Up

Navigate Right
The student news of Weston High School
Music Review: Retrospective